Let Me Occupy Your Mind As You Do Mine – Flash Fiction

A darker version of a similar idea for Bookends bookstore.

A darker version of a similar idea for Bookends bookstore.

Rafe Simon sat at the small table that separated Bookends from The French Press coffee shop. It was both the most unpopular table, from eight in the morning till two in the afternoon, or the most sought after table, from two-thirty to five.  It became a very popular table mid afternoon when high school girls would fight over the coveted table just to have the chance to watch Jeff, Mia’s Elvis Costello wannabe assistant, working in the bookstore. Personally, while Rafe enjoyed chatting with Jeff, he couldn’t quite understand the girls’ fascination. Especially the floppy hair, skinny jeans, and thick, black, plastic-framed glasses.

Currently, though, Rafe’s view of the shop was quite improved as he observed Mia unloading a shipment of books at the front desk. The Devil’s Food cake slice added to the sweetness of his view, the cake moist, and for once, more chocolatey than most. The lyrics to the song playing in the shop didn’t hurt either. Gotye was eerily singing “Let me occupy your mind, as you do mine….”

Mia glanced up and at Rafe just at that moment, a frown between her brows before it lifted and she smiled. Rafe jerked his head in a hello and he watched her duck her head still grinning. Mission accomplished. Now he was in her mind.

About bloody time, he thought to himself. The woman hadn’t left his thoughts since meeting her two weeks ago. She had taken up residence and while he was loath to kick her out, she did make life rather distracting when it was as if she was twirling her finger in the hair near his ear while he went about his days on holiday. Bloody woman had to be his mate’s girl as well.

Rafe sipped his coffee and watched as Jeff came to take the stacks of paperback books Mia was setting out on the counter. She stopped and grabbed on, flipping it open excitedly.

“O Lord! He will hang upon him like a disease!” she exclaimed, dramatically leaning against Jeff, her forearm pressed to hear forehead.

Rafe chuckled, both at her and at Jeff who had rolled his eyes heavenward and shook his head in mock surrender. “Bravo, Beatrice,” he called, clapping his hands.

Mia blushed and stood upright. “The books for the high school’s play have come in,” she explained. “I love Much Ado About Nothing.”

“Classic play,” Rafe agreed.

“Best play I’ve seen in Ashland,” Mia sighed. She scooped up another stack of books and swirled off, leaving her to occupy Rafe’s mind even more as he pictured taking in a play with her.

the-bookends-love-triangleI started ‘Bookends’ (working title at this point) over ten years ago and I have only recently started thinking of working with it. It’s a love triangle romance with my characters inspired by Colin O’Donoghue, Martin Freeman, and a lovely model from the Garnet Hill catalog.  Like my earlier post about Regina and Luke, this is another Hallmark style story. Granted, in all my original drafts, unlike a Hallmark film, sex is involved. Love scenes are so much fun to write. But as I continue on, I find that sometimes you probably don’t need that. You can add it if it fits the storyline, but it’s not necessary. Unless one is writing a Harlequin Blaze….. I have contemplated that as well.

But at this point, all my stories are a Hallmark style story, and like the film, Love Actually, everyone in every story is connected at some point. Be it best friends each have their love story, or other stories are just connected somehow. One day, ONE DAY, I might have them all written. Sigh. Right now, I play out my characters in my head more than writing them.

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An Open Letter Sonnet – Open Letter to Shakespeare – PAD

I couldn’t resist posting this. I just finished my sonnet for PAD’s  Day 29 who’s prompt was basically an open letter. I am doing my sonnets, so what better way to write an open letter sonnet then to the Bard himself.

 

Open Letter to Shakespeare

Dear Bard, in your small verse you write so odd
From lines that stop then start then go along
And heroes spouting words the crowds applaud
That until tired my eyes do wave so long

But plays to make us laugh and sigh you do
Fair ladies face full with youth’s beauty bright
The story strong the setting lush it’s true
And endings leaving us to know all’s right

But your expanding sonnets make me sigh
And wonder why you wrote so strange and long
When words so simple could be said to lie
And all could know and love such words, your song

Am I to keep to mocking your old plays
But I do love your plays it’s true, these days

 

I really had fun with that one.  Any opinions on this piece, be it flow, word phrasing, and is it really iambic pentameter, let me know.

 

Kate

A Smattering of Sonnets for PAD Chapbook Challenge

English: Shakespeare's sonnet 1

English: Shakespeare’s sonnet 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I have been knee deep in writing sonnets. Thinking about them, thinking in iambic pentameter, or at least iambic. I have figured it out finally. The iambic thing. Writing sonnets, well it’s a lesson every time I set my pen to paper.

We are nearly done with the challenge, and I am having to play catch up. I wished I could have written one a day, but it’s more like a one ever two days kind of thing, unless absolute inspiration hits me and then I splat one out, and I do mean splat. It hits the paper running and is there without a chance of changing it.

I wanted to include a few here. I told CB Wentworth that I would post some. Her haikus, by the way, have been totally inspiring.

Did anyone else do the PAD Chapbook Challenge by Writer’s Digest? I would love to know if you did.

So because the holiday season is upon us, here is my Festive sonnet—

All Good Cheer

The eggnog sits upon the table top
and whipped cream islands are floating there
We wait for guests to drink the rich stuff up
And clink a glass to wish us all good cheer.

The music plays in subtle waves of sound
And candle light is glowing golden bright
The snow is falling softly to the ground
The peace is here on this, this Christmas night

We wait for Santa bringing gifts of joy
For carols sung in happy songs refrain
A tree for all to reflect and enjoy
As toasts are clinked with a glass of champagne

This Christmas Eve we wish you all good cheer
A pleasure lasting us throughout the year

 

Then my ‘Divided’ sonnet—

Trust is But a Divide

I trusted you in moments like we had
A force of love and friendship here right now
It took me time to see the flaws unsaid
Divided we stand is what I will avow

In time we may forget the lines that break
I stand on lines you stand right there apart
A split on down the middle thoughts we make
Can we go on this way and not depart

If sides must choose I choose my side it’s clear
And you are wrong as wrong as wrong can be
I must not break this stand I take to bear
And you will go and leave me you will see

We once were strong and now we are broken
These words are worse than when they were spoken

And my ‘idea’ sonnet. This one is inspired by a particular holiday film. A classic. If you know it, tell me.

The Idea’s Ideal

A grand idea call for troops to come
We’ll throw a show and make it big, you say
Ideal it is oh ho let’s go have fun
It’s rather good, idea that’s to day

The girls can do their number sparkling blue
We are in army duds and with our caps
We’ll sing to General, he’s our good man true
A rousing cheer for him, the best of chaps

The war has passed us long ago we’ll sing
Let’s clap our hands and give one last applaud
This man is ours salute him for this fling
As snow is falling and we all stand awed

It’s Christmas now so sing a song to joy
For love and hope and friends we all enjoy

 

 

So there are three that are quite fun. I have more, but I want to revise some. And we shall see. I finished up one tonight that has my heart just so happy, despite the sadness I’m putting into it. It’s weird. I am getting to vent some frustration I’m having with Boris.  I put so much emotion into my writings.  Honestly, if you feel your writing is stale, have some angst in your life. It really solidifies feelings.  Anger, hurt, sadness, pain…. love. It all comes out when you write poetry.

So, enjoy. Only two more days of the challenge, then a month of revision. And I still have four more days of Writing 101 to finish up. Aahhhh, I need to get hustling!

Kate

The Pleasure of Your Company – Blogging U – Poetry 201

English: Shakespeare's sonnet 1

English: Shakespeare’s sonnet 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So, I actually have been looking forward to writing this sonnet, which is why with the Poetry 201 course, I am doing it before the concrete poem, and the ballad.  I was inspired by someone who I met this year. The way I responded to him has changed my outlook on who I need and want in a partner.  This person made me feel so much of who I am, I didn’t even question it. I could be exactly who I was without any artifice or a hidden doors. I was who I was, and it was the most comfortable place in the world.

So the assignment was : Day 10: Pleasure, Sonnet, Apostrophe

I went with the Shakespearean  Sonnet in the abab cdcd efef gg writing scheme. As for pleasure, easy to see, and as I was writing this to someone, well, the apostrophe fits. I hope. 😛  I do hope you enjoy.

 

The Pleasure of Your Company

I’ve had the pleasure of your sweet time
On this the day you came from far away
When the summer sun had yet to be mine
And the warmth of you next to me that day

I was lost but you found me once again
Becoming more to what I was before
Now I know truth of so much more remain
And a change is what I know desire for

My hopes are open and so much clearer
All things have taken on a grander light
The pages I write are my true mirror
You brought be back from the darkest of night

I can be me in all that I now see
This is the pleasure you have brought to me.

Kate

Future – A Sonnet to Think On

Future

The future is a foggy mist waiting
And like water it slips through our fingers
Opening drawers of thoughts of waking
A landscape of ideas that will linger

Dare I attempt to write the things over
An elegy here and a ballad there
The ballad first, an elegy slower
Maybe I should just write the prose to compare

Poetry is in my future plans I know
And the past mistakes will fade in time
Time always fades the mistakes I know
New horizons are in the coming rhymes

I shall miss the companions I write with
But life will go on for I am a word smith.

 

 

Hello all you wonderful people I connected with in the Commons.  This is my last *sob* assignment. A sonnet on the future.  What a perfect way to end the course.  I attempted to stick with a Shakespearian sonnet in style  abab cdcd efef gg, and along with the iambic pentameter.  I’m not sure I managed that perfectly, but I have not had a lot of luck with sonnets.  (@BenHuberman I knew you were going to throw a sonnet at us!)

I thought it might be nice to include bits of the themes from the past two weeks. Water, fog, drawers, landscape, ballad, elegy….  And I think it actually turned out rather well. I have been wanting to work more with sonnets, especially since reading Edna St. Vincent Millay‘s sonnets this last year. She has some stunning poetry.

I also want to say that one of the best ways to write poetry has been using the McGill Dictionary of Rhyme program. It is this rhyming dictionary with the space to write your poetry. It gives examples, a thesaurus of sorts, and the schematic of certain poetry forms, including sonnets, since there are several variations.  You might want to check it out if you are like me and have issues rhyming. That being said, I still use my rhyming dictionary more often, but this is nice.

So, I will probably write one more post on this whole experiance, but for now last assignment down, and what fun this course was.

What Did You Do To My Book?

9780399169731_Chasers_of_the_Light-320x440I sat there this evening contemplating blackout poetry. See, I find it rather cool, and lovely, and unique.  So far, one of my favorite ‘authors’ is Tyler Knott Gregson.  I have his book, Chasers of the Light, and some of his blackout poetry is within the pages.  Obviously he had to take a book and black out the words to create his masterpiece, but I wonder, has he ever wondered about someone taking his poetry and blacking it out for their own blackout poetry?

Probably not.

I am not one to destroy a book for art, but at the same time, I have started marking over a book for poetry. I found a paperback copy of The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh, and I picked it because I liked the cover and couldn’t even get into the first pages of the book. I kind of wish I had a heavier book to do this in, but I haven’t found one I like yet. Hardback would be better.  But anyways, I’m marking the book and I have one poem done. And it’s pretty, though very beginner-ish.

I think I need to find a better pen than a sharpie….

But here I am marking a book and ‘destroying’ the words within for my own gain.  Would I feel so comfortable if I knew someone were taking my novel, my poetry, and marking it over?

Probably not. But art is art. Right?

Honestly, I’m not sure how I feel about the whole thing. I picked up an older discarded copy of C.S. Forester‘s Flying Colors (a Captain Hornblower novel) thinking that would be fun to mark the pages. But I just can’t seem to bear marking the book. It’s mixed feelings. Wanting to create, but not wanting to mar what might be a good book.

And while I love Tyler Knott Gregson’s poetry and how he uses scraps of paper, I cringe at the thought of taking a blank page out of the front of an antique or old book.

See, my first love over writing, is books. They should be cherished and loved like a woman, and you don’t just discard them or rip pages out of them and turn them into something new. The woman analogy still applies here.  So, I’m at a crossroads of creating. Do I destroy to create something new?

Or do I find alternative methods to creating these new styles of poetry?

Gads, what would Sir Walter Scott, William Shakespeare, and Emily Dickinson think of these new forms?

Kate

While These Visions Did Appear

Lliight+as_large

[via weheartit]

If we shadows have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumbered here
While these visions did appear.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, act 5 scene 1

~William Shakespeare

 

I know this is a sad post in comparison to what I normally write, but I am completely uninspired at the moment.  I found this enchanting picture on We Heart It, a website of all things heart, girly and inspiring.  The quote is of course from one of The Bard’s best plays, and as it is midsummer….

Signing off~

Kate

The Romance of Romeo and Juliet

Romance in the making

 This week I watched Letters To Juliet.  Based on the book ” Letters to Juliet: Celebrating Shakespeare’s Greatest Heroine, the Magical City of Verona, and the Power of Love” by Lise Friedman and Ceil Friedman, the movie delves into letters written to Juliet of Verona.  Letters to Juliet  is an incredibly romantic movie and I would recommend it to women specifically.   

 But what is it about Romeo and Juliet that has captured people for centuries?  I have never read the play, but even I can quote a line or two from it.  “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!”   A quote I heard years ago on an episode of Charmed.  It stuck with me and it is  an incredibly romantic phrase.  Then there is the classic phrase I’m sure everyone knows. “O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?”I probably know more quotes than I realize.   

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?

Author of a classic

William Shakespeare was an  amazing author.  To turn a tragic story into a great thing.  Wow.  Now, that still doesn’t make me want to see the play, or read it, but I get it.  Personally, I hate tragedy.  I would rather not end up crying at the end of a play, or movie.  I did that last week with Nights in Rodanthe. (by the way, that movie is so sad!)  I don’t need to cry. However, one day I might see the play done. Who knows.  

I do know that I would highly recommend Letters To Juliet to anyone.  The premise of the story is very sweet and charming.  The romance throughout the film incredible.  The ending? Well that is classic and though it may be somewhat predictable, no less romantic.  The film ends incredibly well, and I think I shall definitely look to own the it.
 
Signing off

~Kate