October 18 – Write 31 Days – Bright Dead Things

bright-dead-thingsThere is beauty in death and dying, though I find it more so when it comes to plants.  Living animals are a bit too morbid to go there. But the remains of a flower, just the sepals holding on to their former selves…. sheer magnificence. I like taking pictures of things up close that you might not notice. These are the remains of flowers, only about a centimeter and a half across, and honestly I can’t tell you what the flower was. But the creek bed (the part that is rarely under water) was covered; littered; with these. I like the tan colors….


October 14th – Write 31 Days – Sunny Sunflower

sunny-sunflowerThe sunflowers are nearly over, mostly having given up their seeds to the titmice, nuthatches, blue jays and Stellar’s Jays, but sometimes there is an odd flower or two. Currently it is really raining now, so this picture came from last week when the weather was more cooperative to taking pictures. I also felt the need to post this for Mrs. Austen who is missing her husband while he is overseas for a business trip.  She loves Sunflowers. I must oblige.

But on the hill the goldenrod, and the aster in the wood,
And the yellow sunflower by the brook in autumn beauty stood,
Till fell the frost from the clear cold heaven, as falls the plague on men,
And the brightness of their smile was gone, from upland, glade, and glen.

The Death of the Flowers ~ William Cullen Bryant

October 12th – Write 31 Days – Calendulas

My favorite flower is the violet. Unobtrusive, fragrant, purple. It’s a lovely flower. But it is terribly un-photogenic, at least for me. On the other hand, Calendulas, or Pot Marigolds (as its common name goes) are so photogenic that they are practically models. Gorgeous ladies ready to strut their stuff. I take so many pictures of them that I want to fill a wall with yellow, orange, cream and peaches.  There are the simples, and the doubles and the mutant ones, and the ones that we wonder where they have come from because they are as fluffy as a lion’s head or maybe a dandelion crossed with a mum and said,  “oh let’s dress our kid up like a dahlia.”  And autumn is their time to shine, though they start blooming in spring. But it’s the autumn ones that come on new plants that explode out in beauty.

Calendula is not only beautiful, but horribly medicinal as well. Salves made from the flowers can heal burns and chapped skin. The tisane made from the petals can help cure eye problems; infections and what not. I used to use a tea made of the flowers to help my rabbit’s eye.  They are beautiful and useful. Honestly, they might be my second favorite flower. Now that I think about it.


October 9th – Write 31 Days – Blue on Bleu

blue-on-blueI found these bachelor-buttons for the lapel of your gray coat. Come here while I draw the stems through the buttonhole. – Beckoning Trails by Emilie Loring

I couldn’t resist using a line from an Emilie Loring book, who as an author, describes fall so perfectly that it makes me ache to visit the Northeast. That being said, I can’t stress how much I love autumn here. A lot of flowers have fried from a nasty frost/freeze last week, so the flowers are limited to mums, bachelor buttons, calendula, asters and some yarrow.  The bachelor buttons always are so, so cheery in the fall, what with the blueish backgrounds and such. I love the clear color of the blue.


Violet Sort of Girl

Today Jaclyn Rae posted a blog titled, ‘I’m a Sunflower. What are You?‘.   Now, the post didn’t really go into details about why she is a sunflower, but it got me thinking.

What kind of flower am I?

Yeah, no, this isn’t one of those whoo hoo mystically weird posts.  I don’t do that.


If I could be a flower, I would be a wild violet. 

Ok, yeah, this is a johnny jump up, but I can't find my violet pictures.

Granted, that stems partly from it being my favorite flower.  It’s a shy sort of flower, but it packs a wallop in scent.  You can smell them on a warm spring day, the scent wafting up from the shady hidden depths of the lawn.  Though, for the record, they actually do much better in the sun, and sunshine makes them smell better.

I love violets.  They are usually the first sign of spring around here, though lately the wild cyclamen is fighting for that position.  Well, either way, cyclamen, violets, they are both gorgeous in the spring.  Especially after an amazingly loooooooonnnnnggggg winter.  This was one of those years.

After months of rain, snow, wind, snow, rain, fog, clouds, rain, snow, rain, oh and did I mention rain?  It’s been nice to see sun, (though that has been limited) and spring flowers.


Crocuses, hepatica, cyclamen, violets, blue weedy flowers that I have no idea what they are called, daffodils starting to poke their sunny heads up.  It’s about time!  I seriously thought I was going to go nuts with all the rain and snow.

Oh, here’s irony for you.  The first day of spring it snowed eight inches of snow!  Eight inches!  Puleez.  Thankfully it was practically all melted by the time 3pm rolled around.  Go figure.

Now, I am not totally complaining, oh, and I promise the ‘valley girl’ talking will end in a moment here,  but I do crave some sun occasionally.  We do need it to survive.

Someone asked me how my day was yesterday.  I think I surprised him when I beamed at him and said, “really good.  It’s sunny, and it’s always a good day if there is sun.”  I actually coaxed a smile out of this person who never  smiles.  See, so even that made it a good day.

And this post really has nothing to do with anything, but well, I needed something to write about and well, flowers are always a good thing.

Signing off